Kelley Blue Book Loves the Leaf - 2018 Nissan Leaf EV Forum
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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-09-2018, 09:04 AM Thread Starter
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Kelley Blue Book Loves the Leaf


The people over at Kelley Blue Book seem to be very impressed with the next generation Leaf. They have awarded the Nissan Leaf for being the least expensive car to own over a 5 year period. I'm assuming this was all based upon projections, as the Leaf has only been on the market for a short period of time and deliveries are just starting. Regardless its great to see that the Leaf continues to prove its value.
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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-09-2018, 09:51 AM
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That's based on cost of ownership over a span of five years including maintenance, fuel and depreciation over time. Which means you won't get too bad of a deal if you decide to sell off the new Leaf a few years down the road or the dealership leases won't cost too much.
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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-10-2018, 12:02 PM
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Yeah hopefully these projections are accurate and mean that the new Leaf will have good resale value. It really does reinforce the fact that electrics are a long term investment, and you likely wont see a return on your investment until years down the line.
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-12-2018, 09:57 AM
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With the lower depreciation rate, dealerships will lose less money over the course of those lease years and those costs won't be pushed onto customers. Loss of value is one of the largest contributing factors in car ownership.
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-14-2018, 09:15 AM Thread Starter
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Unfortunately this is all based on projections and there is no knowing what changes will happen in the market. We already know that car prices may increase with these new tariffs on steel and aluminum, and we have no idea what the backlashes will be.
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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-15-2018, 09:17 AM
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With its lower range, is it not safe to assume that the Leaf will require more frequent charging and as a result have a higher running cost than its rivals? I guess for some reason Kelley BB thinks the Leaf will hold its value better than other EV's in the segment, which I find a little hard to believe with as a new model.
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-16-2018, 09:58 AM
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What really matters is the projections when you sign the lease because Nissan can't change your rates willy nilly if the depreciation rate is actually higher than expected. Though youi do bring up a good point when it comes to battery charge decreasing over time with more frequent charges. Isn't the battery covered fro a certain amount of range loss over time?
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-19-2018, 09:11 AM Thread Starter
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I think on average these batteries retain 80% of their initial range over the course of 10 years, so pretty much for the whole duration of average ownership. I think he was referring to the actual costs associated with charging your car more frequently, which imo would be negligible.
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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-20-2018, 09:23 AM
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There is no denying that draining and charging the battery on a more continuous basis, will have an impact on the batteries lifetime. I know there are a lot of suggestions from Nissan in the owners manual, to try and maintain the batteries integrity.
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post #10 of 13 (permalink) Old 03-20-2018, 10:16 AM
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Just charge overnight when electricity costs is cheapest. I've done the calculations once and this was based on the larger battery Bolt EV assuming charging slows down or stops when the battery if full. It'll only cost me around $50 a month to keep the Bolt EV charged for my daily use and weekend trips, whereas my gas bill could hit $100 or more a month.
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